Special Alert: Analysis of Final ECOA and HPML Appraisal Rules

On January 18, the federal banking agencies issued a final rule amending Regulation Z to implement certain requirements from the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (the Dodd-Frank Act) that require creditors to obtain appraisals for a subset of loans called Higher-Priced Mortgage Loans (HPMLs), and to notify consumers who apply for these loans of their right to a copy of appraisal. On the same day, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau issued a final rule under the Equal Credit Opportunity Act (ECOA), as amended by the Dodd-Frank Act, to require creditors to provide residential mortgage loan applicants with a copy of any and all appraisals and other written valuations developed in connection with an application for closed or open-end credit that is to be secured by a first lien on a dwelling.  Both rules take effect on January 18, 2014.  BuckleySandler has prepared a Special Alert that provides additional details regarding the HPML appraisal rule, as well as a Special Alert regarding the ECOA appraisal rule.

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D.C. Circuit Declares President Obama’s NLRB Recess Appointments Unconstitutional

On January 25, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit held that appointments to the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) made by President Obama in January 2012 during a purported Senate recess were unconstitutional, and vacated an order of the NLRB as constituted with those improperly appointed members. Noel Canning v. NLRB, No. 12-1115, slip. op (D.C. Cir. Jan. 25, 2013). The court, making a distinction between recesses generally and “the Recess” as used in the Constitution, held that the President can only make recess appointments during intersession recesses, and not during intrasession recesses. The court explained that the President’s NLRB appointments were made during an intrasession recess, as the Senate was operating pursuant to a unanimous consent agreement that provided it would meet in pro forma sessions. Moreover, the court held that the President may only fill vacancies that arise or begin during such intersession recesses, as opposed to vacancies that happen to exist during such recesses. The court determined that the vacancies at issue here existed well before the recess. The court held that the appointments were constitutionally “invalid from their inception” and therefore the NLRB lacked a quorum to issue the NLRB order challenged on appeal. The court vacated the NLRB’s order at issue. The President appointed CFPB Director Richard Cordray as a recess appointment on the same day the President appointed the NLRB members. Mr. Cordray’s appointment is the subject of a lawsuit currently pending in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia.

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POSTED IN: Consumer Finance, Courts

President Obama Re-nominates Richard Cordray for CFPB Director, Nominates Mary Jo White for SEC Chair

On January 24, President Obama announced his re-nomination of current CFPB Director Richard Cordray. Mr. Cordray has led the Bureau since January 2012 when President Obama used his recess appointment authority to install the CFPB director. Absent Senate confirmation, Mr. Cordray’s recess appointment expires at the end of this year. Further, the constitutionality of that appointment may be called into question by a recent federal appellate court decision addressing other recess appointments. Also on January 24, President Obama nominated Mary Jo White for Senate confirmation to serve as Chairman of the SEC. Ms. White is a former U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York, during which time she led high-profile prosecutions of organized crime members and terrorists. Most recently she was in private practice.

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California County Drops Consideration of Eminent Domain Proposal

On January 24, a Joint Powers Authority established by San Bernardino County decided not to pursue a proposal under which the County would use eminent domain power to seize underwater mortgages from private trusts and provide principal reduction for the borrowers. In announcing the decision, the chairman of the Authority explained that the decision was based on warnings from experts about the destabilizing effect on the housing market such a policy would have, and noted that county residents did not favor the proposal. Instead, the Authority approved an agreement to work with banking, mortgage, real estate, and investment firms to connect homeowners with appropriate mortgage assistance programs. San Bernardino had been closely watched since it began pursuing the concept last year. Its decision could portend how other localities will proceed. At least one recent report indicates that several other localities that have been considering eminent domain proposals already were wary of the concept even before San Bernardino’s decision.

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POSTED IN: Mortgages

FHFA Settles One of Many Pending MBS Suits

On January 23, the FHFA settled and voluntarily dismissed one of the lawsuits it initiated in 2011 as conservator for Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, alleging against many parties that billions of dollars of MBS purchased by the GSEs were based on offering documents that contained materially false statements and omissions. FHFA v. Gen. Elec. Co., No. 11-7048, Notice of Dismissal (Jan. 23, 2013). This is the first settlement to be announced in connection with this series of cases; the lead case currently is on appeal to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit. Although the FHFA did not release any details related to the settlement, in reports the FHFA’s general counsel described the resolution as “consistent with FHFA’s responsibilities as conservator.”

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POSTED IN: Federal Issues, Mortgages, Securities