OFAC Issues Finding of Violation for Alleged Violations of Sudanese Sanctions Regulations

On February 4, OFAC announced that a subsidiary of a New Jersey-based manufacturer violated the Sudanese Sanctions Regulations, for a period of 7 months in 2010, by facilitating the exportation of goods to Sudan by coordinating and supervising shipments of goods from an Egyptian branch of the company to Khartoum, Sudan. Pursuant to the General Factors under OFAC’s Economic Sanctions Enforcement Guidelines, OFAC issued a Finding of Violation to the subsidiary based in part on the following “aggravating” factors: (i) acting with reckless disregard for U.S. sanctions requirements by making exports to Sudan when it knew it may be subject to restrictions under U.S. sanctions; (ii) failing to properly take into consideration the implications of OFAC regulations – even though it is part of a corporation with experience in international trade – when it restructured its consumer business and placed a U.S. company in charge of sales to Sudan; and (iii) failing to include in its compliance program training on OFAC regulations for its General Manager, who was responsible for sales to Sudan. OFAC also determined that the subsidiary’s General Manager for Emerging Markets in the Middle East and North Africa was not only aware of but also involved in conduct giving rise to the violations. OFAC issued a Finding of Violation in lieu of a civil money penalty, after considering various mitigating factors, including the subsidiary’s effort to take remedial action, such as implementing additional compliance training and conducting an internal investigation of the violations, the absence of a prior OFAC sanctions history and its cooperation with OFAC’s investigation.

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European Commission Announces Agreement with the US on the Framework for Transatlantic Data Flows

On February 2, the members of the European Commission approved a new framework for transatlantic data flows: EU-US Privacy Shield. The European Commission and the United States agreed to a deal that reflects the requirements set forth in the Court of Justice of the European Union’s (CJEU) October 6, 2015 decision declaring the old Safe Harbor framework invalid. The agreement aims to protect “fundamental rights of Europeans where their data is transferred to the United States and ensure legal certainty for businesses.” Specifically, the drafters of the new framework attempt to provide (i) robust obligations on U.S. companies to ensure that they are protecting Europeans’ personal data, such as strengthened monitoring by the Department of Commerce and the FTC and increased cooperation with European Data Protection Authorities; (ii) written commitments by the U.S. that “the access of public authorities for law enforcement and national security will be subject to clear limitations, safeguards and oversight mechanisms”; and (iii) effective protection of Europeans’ rights regarding how their data is handled, including several redress possibilities and the creation of an Ombudsperson to whom they can raise inquiries or complaints. Commenting on the agreement, Commission Vice-President Ansip stated, “[t]oday’s decision helps us build a Digital Single Market in the EU, a trusted and dynamic online environment; it further strengthens our close partnership with the US.” In the upcoming weeks, the U.S. will prepare to put in place the new framework while Vice-President Ansip and Commissioner Jourová prepare a draft “‘adequacy decision,’” which could be “adopted by the [Commission] after obtaining the advice of the Article 29 Working Party (WP29) and after consulting a committee composed of representatives of the Member States.”             Read more…

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Germany-Based Software Company Settles Bribery Case with SEC for $3.7 Million

On February 1, the SEC agreed to a $3.7 million settlement with a Germany-based software company regarding allegations that it violated the FCPA regarding the payment and offer of bribes to senior Panamanian government officials. The settlement, stemming from the actions of the company’s former executive Vincente Garcia who pleaded guilty last August to one count of conspiracy to violate the FCPA, found that the company lacked appropriate internal controls to detect the illegal activity. According to the SEC, Garcia arranged the sale of heavily discounted software licenses and used the savings to create a “slush fund.” The money in this fund was then used to pay bribes and kickbacks.

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California-Based Pharmaceutical Company Settles with SEC Regarding FCPA Offenses in China

On February 4, the SEC settled FCPA allegations with a California-based pharmaceutical company with a cease and desist order finding that the company violated the FCPA’s anti-bribery, books and records, and internal controls provisions related to activities in China. The SEC found that from at least 2007 to 2012, employees of the company’s subsidiaries gave money and gifts to Chinese officials (including employees of state-owned hospitals) in order to boost sales. The SEC further found that the company failed to devise and implement a sufficient system of internal accounting controls and lacked an effective anti-corruption compliance program.

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OFAC Issues Amendments to Cuba Sanctions Regulations

On January 26, OFAC announced amendments to the Cuban Assets Control Regulations (CACR) to further implement policy changes announced by the Obama Administration on December 17, 2014. The regulatory changes will, among other things, “remove existing restrictions on payment and financing terms for authorized exports and reexports to Cuba of items other than agricultural items and commodities, and establish a case-by-case licensing policy for exports and reexports of items to meet the needs of the Cuban people, including those made to Cuban state-owned enterprises.” Significantly, under the amendments, U.S. depository institutions will be authorized to provide financing for authorized exports and reexports, including issuing a letter of credit. Prior to the amendments, cash-in-advance or third-country financing were the only financing options available for authorized exports.

OFAC issued new FAQs to address the amended CACR, which were published in the Federal Register on January 27, 2016 and are effective immediately.

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Iran Sanctions: Treasury Comments on JCPOA Implementation Day

On January 16, the Department of the Treasury issued a statement regarding Implementation Day under the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA), the plan reached between the P5+1 (the United States, China, France, Russia, the United Kingdom, and Germany), the European Union, and Iran concerning Iran’s nuclear program. In response to Iran taking the appropriate nuclear-related measures, the United States followed through on lifting nuclear-related “secondary sanctions” on Iran, which included certain financial and banking-related sanctions. To summarize the effect of Implementation Day, OFAC issued guidance and FAQs. As outlined in the FAQs and in addition to lifting the nuclear-related “secondary sanctions,” the United States removed more than 400 individuals and entities from OFAC’s List of Specially Designated Nationals and Blocked Persons (SDN List). Still, as Treasury Secretary Lew noted, “other than certain limited exceptions provided for in the JCPOA, the U.S. embargo broadly remains in place, meaning that U.S. persons, including U.S. banks, will still be prohibited from virtually all dealings with Iranian entities.”

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Oil and Gas Company Files Lawsuit Against Drilling Partners Challenging Post-FCPA Settlement Reticence

On January 11, a Houston-based oil and gas company filed suit in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Texas against its drilling partners in the company’s Guinean operations. The company claims that the drilling partners have unjustly delayed performing the work called for by their operating agreement because of uncertainty over whether the government of Guinea would terminate its drilling agreement with the company in light of the FCPA investigation into the company. That investigation was resolved by a declination letter issued by DOJ in May 2015 and a settlement with the SEC in October 2015. (See previous InfoBytes coverage of that investigation here and here.) The company is seeking a ruling that the drilling partners are in violation of the operating agreement and an order forcing them to fulfill their obligations.

In a November 2015 SEC filing, the company reported a complete lack of operating revenue and warned that further delays in fulfilling requirements imposed by the government of Guinea could result in a loss of the company’s concession to drill in the country. This case illustrates the potential business risks posed by an FCPA investigation—even if it is resolved on relatively favorable terms.

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Printing Company Fined £2.2 Million in United Kingdom for Africa Bribes

On January 8, the United Kingdom’s Serious Fraud Office announced that a printing company specializing in official documents such as election ballots was ordered to pay penalties totaling £2.2 million following its 2014 conviction under the Prevention of Corruption Act 1906. The SFO’s announcement regarding the sentencing stated that its investigation began in 2010 and centered on £395,074 in corrupt payments made to foreign officials in Kenya and Mauritania. Two of the company’s former employees, also convicted in connection with the same investigation, were ordered to pay penalties totaling over £20,000.

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OFAC Publishes Cyber-Related Sanctions Regulations

On December 31, OFAC issued regulations to implement Executive Order 13694 of April 1, 2015, “Blocking the Property of Certain Persons Engaging in Significant Malicious Cyber-Enabled Activities.” Effective immediately, the regulations prohibit all transactions prohibited by Executive Order 13694, including dealing in the property or interests in property, that come within the United States, of blocked persons. Among other things, under Executive Order 13694, a party may be blocked if the U.S. government finds the party  “to be responsible for or complicit in, or to have engaged in, directly or indirectly, cyber-enabled activities originating from, or directed by persons located, in whole or in substantial part, outside the United States that are reasonably likely to result in, or have materially contributed to, a significant threat to the national security, foreign policy, or economic health or financial stability of the United States” and that have one of the purposes or effects enumerated in the Order. More information on the Executive Order is available here. OFAC’s Specially Designated Nationals (SDN) List will include persons blocked pursuant to the Executive Order and regulation. OFAC intends to supplement the new regulations with a more comprehensive set of regulations, “which may include additional interpretive and definitional guidance, regarding ‘cyber-enabled’ activities, and additional general licenses and statements of licensing policy.”

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FIFA Ethics Committee Issues Eight-Year Bans to President and Vice President

On December 21, the FIFA Ethics Committee announced that it would ban its embattled President, Sepp Blatter, and Vice President, Michel Platini, from all football-related activities for eight years. The ban was imposed as a result of an investigation into a payment of $2 million from FIFA to Platini in 2011 that was authorized by Blatter. The Ethics Committee’s statement on their decision stated that the payment was made without a legal basis. Platini is currently the head of UEFA, the governing body of European football. News reports state that it was widely anticipated that Platini would be elected President of FIFA in the upcoming 2016 election, but he has now withdrawn his candidacy following the Ethics Committee’s decision. Click here to view prior InfoBytes coverage on FIFA.

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OFAC Updates SDN and Blocked Persons List

On December 22, OFAC updated its Specially Designated Nationals (SDNs) list to identify additional persons and entities with which U.S. citizens and permanent residents are prohibited from doing business and whose assets or interests in assets must be frozen if they come within the jurisdiction of the U.S. OFAC’s update to the SDN list names 34 individuals and entities under Ukraine-related sanctions and authorities. In addition, OFAC identified – under the Sectoral Sanctions Identifications List – a number of subsidiary companies that are at least 50% owned by two previously-sanctioned banks and/or one previously-sanctioned defense company.

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FinCEN Announces MOU with China Anti-Money Laundering Monitoring and Analysis Center

On December 11, FinCEN announced that Director Jennifer Shasky Calvery and the China Anti-Money Laundering Monitoring and Analysis Center (CAMLMAC) Director-General Luo Yang of the People’s Republic of China signed an MOU “to create a framework to facilitate expanded U.S.-China collaboration, communication, and cooperation between both nations’ financial intelligence units.” As the financial intelligence unit (FIU) for the United States, FinCEN is responsible for combating money laundering and the financing of terrorism by collecting, analyzing, and disseminating financial intelligence to law enforcement and other relevant authorities; as the Chinese counterpart to FinCEN, the CAMLMAC has comparable responsibilities to the Chinese government. The recently announced MOU is intended to provide a “mechanism for sharing information on money laundering and the financing of terrorism in order to prevent illicit actors from abusing either country’s financial systems.”

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New York DFS Announces Enforcement Action Against Pakistan-Based Bank’s New York Branch

On December 17, the New York DFS announced an enforcement action against a New York branch of a Pakistan-based bank. The Federal Reserve Bank of New York (FRBNY) and the DFS recently conducted an examination of the branch and found significant risk management and compliance failures with regard to state and federal laws, rules, and regulations relating to anti-money laundering (AML) compliance. Under the terms of the DFS’s order, the branch agreed to reform its policies and procedures to ensure compliance with AML laws. Per the order, the bank must submit to the DFS, within 60 days of the order, a number of written programs regarding its (i) corporate governance and management oversight; (ii) BSA/AML compliance review; (iii) customer due diligence; and (iv) suspicious activity monitoring and reporting. The branch must also hire an independent third-party approved by the DFS and the FRBNY to review the effectiveness of the bank’s compliance program, and to prepare a written report of its findings, conclusions, and recommendations for the program. Because the branch’s compliance with OFAC regulations was insufficient, the order also mandates that the bank retain an independent third-party to examine its U.S. dollar-clearing transactions between October 2014 and March 2015. Significantly, the order does not require the branch to pay a civil money penalty.

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Former Executive Sentenced for Conspiracy to Bribe Panamanian Government Officials

On December 16, the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California sentenced a former regional director of a Pennsylvania-based software and technology company for his involvement in a conspiracy to bribe Panamanian government officials to obtain technology contracts. U.S. District Judge Charles R. Breyer sentenced Vicente Eduardo Garcia to 22 months in prison for his role in the bribery scheme. In August 2015, Garcia pleaded guilty to conspiracy to violate the FCPA, admitting that in 2009 he and others conspired to bribe two Panamanian government officials directly and a third official through an agent in order to obtain a contract to provide a Panamanian state agency with a technology upgrade package. Garcia and his co-conspirators used sham contracts and false invoices to conceal the bribes, and Garcia personally received over $85,000 for arranging the bribes. Garcia previously settled with the SEC and agreed to pay disgorgement of $85,965 plus prejudgment interest.

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Former Russian Government Official Sentenced For Nuclear Energy Conspiracy Involving FCPA Violations

On December 15, a former Russian government official, Vadim Mikerin, was sentenced to 48 months in prison for conspiracy to commit money laundering in connection with $2 million in bribe payments he accepted to award government contracts with a Russian state-owned nuclear energy corporation. U.S. District Judge Theodore D. Chuang of the District of Maryland also ordered Mikerin, who resides in Maryland, to forfeit $2.1 million. Between 2004 and October 2014, Mikerin received bribe payments intended to improperly influence him in his role as a key official at a subsidiary of a Russian state-owned nuclear energy corporation and to secure improper business advantages for U.S. companies that did business with the subsidiary. Mikerin admitted that, in connection with the FCPA violations, he conspired with others to transmit approximately $2,126,622 from the United States to shell company bank accounts in Cyprus, Latvia and Switzerland. Mikerin also admitted to using consulting agreements and code words to conceal the bribes. Two of Mikerin’s co-conspirators – Daren Condrey and Boris Rubizhevsky – also pleaded guilty to conspiracy charges and are awaiting sentencing.

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