Iowa Governor Signs Bill to Amend Motor Vehicle Purchase Agreement Requirements

On April 13, Governor Terry Branstad signed into law SF 2228, the Motor Vehicle Records and Dealer Licensing Act. The act amends Chapter 321 of Iowa Code 2016 to, among other things, require that the full price of the “documentary fee” included in the purchase of a motor vehicle be “clearly and conspicuously disclosed in any motor vehicle purchase agreement with the customer.” Defined as “a fee that may be charged to a customer by a motor vehicle dealer for the preparation of documents related to an application for motor vehicle registration and an application for issuance of a certificate of title, and the performance of other related services for the customer,” a documentary fee excludes costs or fees charged to a motor vehicle dealer or a dealer’s customer by a third party. For each vehicle sold in a transaction, a documentary fee is limited to $180, unless a form of electronic applications, titling, registering, and transfers is involved, at which point the documentary fee cannot exceed $155. Pursuant to SF 2228, the Department of Transportation must establish and implement a program to allow for electronic applications, titling, registering, and funds transfers for vehicles subject to registration by January 1, 2018.

LinkedInFacebookTwitterGoogle+Share

Alabama Bill Expands Definition of Vehicle Service Contract

On April 4, Alabama Governor Robert Bentley signed into law HB 7, which amends Section 8-32-2 of the Code of Alabama. Specifically, the bill defines road hazard and expands the definition of a vehicle service contract to include (i) certain damages caused by a road hazard; (ii) the replacement of an inoperable, lost, or stolen key or key fob; and (iii) other services approved by the Alabama Commissioner of Insurance.

LinkedInFacebookTwitterGoogle+Share

Massachusetts AG Healey Continues Subprime Auto Loan Review; Lenders to Pay $7.4 Million in Consumer Relief

On March 16, Massachusetts AG Maura Healey announced that two national auto lenders, based in South Carolina and California respectively, agreed to collectively pay $7.4 million in relief to more than two thousand Massachusetts consumers to resolve allegations that they charged excessive interest rates on subprime auto loans. Under the terms of the assurance of discontinuance, the companies will eliminate the alleged excessive interest on certain loans resulting from add-on GAP insurance coverage, forgive outstanding interest on the loans, and reimburse consumers that already paid interest. The South Carolina-based lender will pay approximately $1.7 million in relief to consumers, while the California-based lender will pay the remaining $5.7 million. The settlement agreements further require the lenders to pay $225,000 for implementation of the agreements and to undergo additional auditing to determine if other loans are subject to refunds.

These settlements are part of AG Healey’s subprime loan review initiative. In November 2015, as part of this initiative, AG Healey announced a $5.4 million settlement with a national auto lender to resolve allegations similarly related to the practice of charging inflated interest rates because of add-on GAP insurance coverage.

LinkedInFacebookTwitterGoogle+Share

Maryland Auto Finance Bill Withdrawn from Consideration

On March 11, the Maryland House Committee on Economic Matters reported unfavorably on Maryland House Bill 530. Introduced on February 1, 2016, the bill would have repealed and reenacted, with amendments, Maryland Commercial Law and Annotated Code of Maryland by adding language requiring an assignee of certain documents – retail installment agreements, a note, or other evidence of a loan – relating to the finance purchase of a motor vehicle to provide payment to the seller of the motor vehicle within two business days after approval of the assignment. After the unfavorable report, the bill was withdrawn from consideration.

LinkedInFacebookTwitterGoogle+Share

Massachusetts AG Announces New Consumer Advocacy and Response Division

On March 3, Massachusetts AG Healey announced a new Consumer Advocacy and Response Division (CARD) intended to protect Massachusetts consumers from alleged fraud, unfair business practices, and consumer abuse. The CARD staff will assist consumers with issues such as (i) auto purchasing and financing; (ii) data security and identity theft; (iii) debt collection; and (iv) foreclosure prevention. In 2015, AG Healey’s office handled more than 2,600 consumer complaint cases, resolving issues related to debt collection, auto lending, and securing refunds for disputed charges with cellular phone carriers.

LinkedInFacebookTwitterGoogle+Share