Spotlight Article: California Supreme Court Holds that Borrowers Have Standing to Challenge an Allegedly Void Assignment of the Note and Deed of Trust in an Action for Wrongful Foreclosure

Daniel Paluch Fredrick-LevinYesterday, the California Supreme Court held in Yvanova v. New Century Mortgage Corp, Case No. S218973 (Cal. Sup. Ct. February 18, 2016) that borrowers have standing to challenge an allegedly void assignment of a note and deed of trust in an action for wrongful foreclosure.  In reaching this decision, the Court reversed the rule followed by the overwhelming majority of California courts that borrowers lacked such standing.  The Court’s decision may have broad ramifications for lenders, investors, and servicers of California loans.

The Court’s Holding

In Yvanova, the borrower challenged the validity of her foreclosure on the ground that her loan was assigned into a securitized trust after the trust closing date set forth in the applicable pooling and servicing agreement, allegedly rendering the assignment void.  To date, California courts have rejected hundreds of similar claims.  In Yvanova, the Court held that “a borrower who has suffered a nonjudicial foreclosure does not lack standing to sue for wrongful foreclosure based on an allegedly void assignment merely because he or she was in default on the loan and was not a party to the challenged assignment.”  Slip. Op. at 2.  The Court’s ruling thus breathes new life into this favorite theory of the foreclosure defense bar. Read more…

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