Spotlight on the Military Lending Act, Part 3: Falling in Line with MLA Compliance

Sasha-LeonhardtWith recent changes in the regulations implementing the Military Lending Act (“MLA”), creditors are now reevaluating their compliance plans to ensure they are prepared for the new regulations.  Although there is no formal guidance on what federal regulators will look for in reviewing MLA compliance, the commentary that accompanied both the proposed and final rule gives some insight as to where regulators will focus examination and enforcement resources.  Below, we discuss some of these likely areas of focus, and offer suggestions for how institutions can prepare for regulatory scrutiny.

Determining military service and MLA safe harbor provisions

The MLA only applies to a “covered borrower,” which is either a servicemember (as defined under the MLA) or a servicemember’s dependent.  The MLA provides two safe harbors to determine if a consumer is a covered borrower:  (1) a set of results from the DoD’s MLA database, or (2) a military status indicator in a consumer report.

Although both of these approaches are optional—and a creditor may use a different method to determine if an individual is eligible for MLA protection—they provide several benefits.  They are both determinative, so even if the borrower is in fact a servicemember a safe harbor check that shows otherwise will govern.  Both checks can also be done without
inconveniencing the consumer or requiring them to attest to their military status.

However, these safe harbor approaches are only effective if the results are actually retained by the creditor.  Since military status checks must be performed at origination, we recommend that the results of these checks be retained with the origination documents.  Not only does the outcome of the military status check determine the substantive terms of the actual credit obligation, but by keeping all of these documents together, a creditor can ensure that they have all of the governing origination documents are in a single, secure location. Read more…

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Spotlight on the Military Lending Act, Part 2: Planning for Compliance

Andrew-Grant-captionManley-Williams-caption Ben-Olson-captionCompliance with the revised Department of Defense (“DoD”) regulations under the Military Lending Act (“MLA”) is not mandatory until October 3, 2016 or, for most credit cards, until October 3, 2017.  However, as the recent implementation of the Dodd-Frank Act mortgage regulations shows, a year or even two can pass quickly.  Therefore, institutions should begin planning now.  The following are answers to three key questions that can help you start the planning process.

  1. Which products will be covered by the revised MLA regulations?

The revised MLA regulations apply far beyond the narrow range of small dollar loan products covered today.  Instead, reflecting the DoD’s desire to match to the definition of consumer credit under the Truth in Lending Act’s Regulation Z, the MLA regulations will apply to credit offered or extended to a covered borrower that is:

  • Primarily for personal, family, or household purposes; and
  • Either subject to a finance charge or payable by a written agreement in more than four installments.

However, the following types of credit are excluded:

  • Residential mortgages: Transactions secured by an interest in a dwelling, including a transaction to finance the purchase or initial construction of the dwelling.
  • Secured motor vehicle purchase loans: Transactions that are expressly intended to finance the purchase of a motor vehicle and are secured by that vehicle.
  • Secured personal property purchase loans: Transactions that are expressly intended to finance the purchase of personal property and are secured by that property.
  • TILA-exempt transactions: Transactions that are exempt from Regulation Z (other than pursuant to a State exemption under 12 CFR § 1026.29) or otherwise not subject to disclosure requirements under Regulation Z.

Accordingly, the revised MLA regulations should not affect most mortgage, auto, or commercial lending.  The new regulations will, however, apply to most credit card accounts, overdraft or personal lines of credit, unsecured closed-end loans, and deposit advance products.  Therefore, institutions should focus on preparing the lines of business responsible for these products for compliance with the revised MLA regulations. Read more…

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Spotlight on the Military Lending Act: Did the Final Rule Improve on the Proposal?

Valerie-Hletko-captionBen-Olson-captionOn July 22, 2015, the Department of Defense (“Department”) released its final rule amending the regulations that implement the Military Lending Act (“MLA”), which means that a wider range of credit products—including open-end credit—offered or extended to active duty service members and their dependents (“covered borrowers”) will now be subject to the MLA and its “all-in” 36% military annual percentage rate (“MAPR”) cap.
Andrew-Grant-captionManley-Williams-captionSpecifically, the Department expanded the definition of “consumer credit” to be consistent with credit that is subject to the Truth-in-Lending Act (“TILA”)—credit offered or extended to a covered borrower primarily for personal, family, or household purposes, and that is (i) subject to a finance charge or (ii) payable by a written agreement in more than four installments.

In response to the initial proposed rule, financial services industry stakeholders undertook a substantial effort to show how proposed modifications to the MLA regulations were overly broad and, in parts, inconsistent with the Department’s mandate under the MLA.  At a high level, industry comment letters fell into five categories: Read more…

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DOD Proposes Expanded Coverage Of Military Lending Act Protections

On September 29, a proposed amendment to the U.S. Department of Defense’s regulation that implements the Military Lending Act (MLA) was published in the Federal Register, with comments due by November 28. Most importantly, the amendment expands the protections of the MLA by defining “consumer credit” to be consistent with closed- and open-end credit products already regulated under TILA, which would include all forms of payday loans, vehicle title loans, refund anticipation loans, deposit advance loans, installment loans, unsecured open-end lines of credit, and credit cards. Currently, the MLA only applies to (i) closed-end payday loans up to $2,000 with a term of 91 days or fewer; (ii) closed-end auto title loans with a term of 181 days or fewer; and (iii) closed-end tax refund anticipation loans. However, the proposed regulation would continue to exclude residential mortgages and purchase-money loans for personal property from coverage, including motor vehicles. The MLA was passed in 2006 and provides active duty servicemembers and their dependents with, among other protections, a 36% interest rate cap, military-specific disclosures, and a prohibition on creditors against requiring the servicemember to submit to arbitration in the event of a dispute.

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CFPB Director Announces Indirect Auto Finance Proxy Methodology White Paper, Discusses Numerous Other Initiatives

On June 18, in an appearance before the House Financial Services Committee, CFPB Director Richard Cordray stated that later this summer the CFPB hopes to release a white paper on the proxy methodology it employs  to identify alleged discrimination in indirect auto financing. The white paper follows repeated attempts by members of the Committee to force the CFPB to reveal more details about its approach to indirect auto finance enforcement. Director Cordray also revealed that the CFPB is working on a white paper regarding manufactured housing finance.

The hearing covered numerous additional topics, some of which overlapped with those addressed during Mr. Cordray’s recent appearance before the Senate Banking Committee. Among the new issues raised before the House Committee, Mr. Cordray expressed openness to developing a limited advisory opinion process for the CFPB. In response to a question from Rep. Ed Royce (R-CA), Mr. Cordray explained that the CFPB regularly provides informal advisory opinions. He acknowledged other agencies’ use of advisory opinions and their potential benefit, and indicated that advisory opinions could be a useful tool for the CFPB on certain specific issues. Nevertheless, he resisted committing to the implementation of a formal advisory opinion process. The Committee recently approved, along party lines, legislation that would require the CFPB to establish an advisory opinion process. Read more…

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