Mississippi Revises State Mortgage Licensing Law

On April 6, Mississippi Governor Phil Bryant signed into law SB 2504, which reenacts and amends the Mississippi S.A.F.E. Mortgage Act. Among other things, the legislation (i) revises licensure and continuing education requirements for mortgage loan originators; (ii) modifies books, accounts, and records storage and filing requirements; (iii) ensures timely and accurate mortgage licensee reporting in the Nationwide Mortgage Licensing System and Registry (NMLS); and (iv) specifically provides that “[f]ailure to file accurate, timely, and complete reports on the [NMLS] may result in a violation of this chapter, resulting in a civil penalty.”

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Indiana Passes House Bill to Amend the Indiana Code

On March 21, Indiana Governor Mike Pence signed H.B. 1181, which makes various revisions to Indiana laws concerning, among other things, (i) first mortgage lien lenders; (ii) persons licensed under the Uniform Consumer Credit Code; (iii) exempt threshold amounts for credit; and (iv) debt management companies. Various sections of the bill are effective immediately, while others will take effect July 1, 2016.

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GA Department of Banking and Finance Enters into Consent Order with Mortgage Lender and Owner

On October 21, the Georgia Department of Banking and Finance (the Department) announced a consent order with a South Carolina-based mortgage lender and its individual owner to resolve a Notice of Intent to Revoke Annual License and an Order to Cease and Desist. The Department alleged that the individual and the company violated the Georgia Residential Mortgage Act by (i) making false statements or misrepresentations to the Department; (ii) making false statements and misrepresenting material facts in mortgage loan documents; (iii) operating an unapproved branch with an unapproved branch manager; (iv) failing to perform the appropriate background checks on covered employees; and (v) transacting business with an unlicensed person who was not exempt from licensing requirements. Under the terms of the Order, the individual is prohibited from (i) applying for a Georgia mortgage loan originator, mortgage broker, or mortgage lender license; (ii) serving as a director, officer, or any other equivalent role for a Georgia mortgage broker or lender; and (iii) acting as a branch manager for a Georgia branch of a Georgia licensed mortgage broker or lender. In addition, the lender must pay $29,000 to the Department and $1,000 to the State Regulatory Registry, LLC to support the NMLS. The lender also must surrender its license from the Department.

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Nevada Assembly Passes Legislation Relating to Mortgage Lending and Servicing Regulation, Licensing and Fees

On June 9, Governor Brian Sandoval (R-NV) signed into law AB 480, which revises existing law concerning the licensing and regulation of escrow agents and escrow agencies.  The law also authorizes a wholesale lender from outside the state to operate in Nevada as a mortgage broker or mortgage banker, and increase fees related to those roles.  Further, the bill requires the Commissioner of Mortgage Lending to prescribe by regulation the requirements for licensing, regulation and discipline of mortgage servicers.  Specific sections of the bill – 101.3, 101.7, and 103 – are effective immediately, while others become effective January 1, 2016.

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GA Department of Banking and Finance Orders Florida Mortgage Lender to Shut Down for Unlicensed Lending Activities

On April 8, the Georgia Department of Banking and Finance issued an Order to Cease and Desist (Order) to a Florida-based mortgage lender. The lender allegedly engaged in residential mortgage origination, brokering, and/or lending activities without having a valid license or the appropriate exemption from the state’s licensing requirements in violation the Georgia Residential Mortgage Act. The Order is final 30 days from the issuance date, but the Department can rescind the Order if, within that 30 day period, the company provides adequate documentation showing that it is either properly licensed or qualifies for exemption.

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