U.S. Senators Introduce Automobile-Focused Cybersecurity Legislation

On July 21, Senators Blumenthal (D-CT) and Markey (D-MA) introduced legislation, the Security and Privacy in Your Car Act (“SPY Car”Act), that would protect drivers’ privacy while allowing them to remain connected to the growing technological advances in the automobile industry. In addition to directing the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) and the FTC to develop federal cybersecurity and privacy standards that would secure motor vehicles manufactured for sale in the United States and protect drivers, the SPY Car Act seeks to establish a rating system, or “cyber dashboard,” that “informs consumers about how well the vehicle protects drivers’ security and privacy” beyond the minimum standards potentially set by the NHTSA and the FTC. The requirements that motor vehicles: (i) be equipped with reasonable measures to protect against hacking attacks; (ii) maintain the ability to reasonably secure data collected within electronic systems; and (iii) be equipped with capabilities to immediately detect, report, and stop attempts to intercept driving data or control the vehicle, are among the cybersecurity standards outlined in the SPY Car Act. In regards to privacy standards, the legislation proposes the following: (i) transparency, such that owners or lessees are explicitly aware of the collection, transmission, retention, and use of driving data; (ii) consumer choice, allowing owners or lessees to opt out of data collection and retention without losing access to other features, such as key navigation; and (iii) marketing prohibition, which would ban companies from using personal driving information for advertising purposes without obtaining the affirmative express consent of the owner or lessee. The introduction of the SPY Car Act follows Senator Markey’s 2015 Tracking & Hacking: Security & Privacy Gaps Put American Drivers at Risk report, which showed gaps in the auto industry’s ability to prevent hackers from accessing internet-connected features in vehicles.

LinkedInFacebookTwitterGoogle+Share

FCC Announces $3.5 Million Settlement with Carriers to Resolve Consumer Privacy Investigation

On July 9, the FCC announced a $3.5 million settlement with carriers TerraCom, Inc. and YourTel America, Inc. to resolve an investigation into the exposure of personal information of over 300,000 of their customers online via unprotected servers used by their vendors to store customer information.  The exposed information included names, addresses, Social Security numbers, driver’s licenses, and other pieces of sensitive information that were viewable by anyone with access to a search engine.  Section 222(a) of the Communications Act imposes on carriers a duty to protect the confidentiality of “proprietary information of… customers” and the FCC Enforcement Bureau viewed this incident as a violation of that duty, as well as its duty under Section 201(b) to employ “just and reasonable” data security practices to protect the confidentiality of consumers’ proprietary information. Under the settlement, TerraCom and YourTel are required to (i) designate a senior corporate manager with certified privacy expertise, (ii) conduct a privacy risk assessment, (iii) put in place a written information security program and data breach response plan, (iv) maintain “reasonable oversight” of third-party vendors, and (v) offer privacy and security training.  FCC-regulated entities should review their privacy and data security practices to ensure that they are taking appropriate steps to protect their customers’ proprietary information.

 

LinkedInFacebookTwitterGoogle+Share

FDIC OIG Publishes Results of Audit of Personally Identifiable Information in Owned Real Estate Properties

On April 28, the FDIC’s Office of the Inspector General published a report – The FDIC’s Controls for Identifying, Securing, and Disposing of Personally Identifiable Information in Owned Real Estate Properties – regarding its audit of the agency’s internal controls of personally identifiable information (PII) in owned real estate (ORE) properties, which it acquires from failed FDIC-insured financial institutions. The audit was conducted to determine whether or not the FDIC’s internal controls sufficiently identified, secured, and disposed of ORE properties’ PII. According to the report, the OIG determined that the agency’s Division of Resolutions and Receivership (DRR), which is responsible for the liquidation of assets, often did not identify PII in a timely manner, and its “practices for handling and disposing of the information were inconsistent in certain key respects.” As a result of the audit, the OIG recommends that the DRR incorporate the following enhancements to its current review process of PII at ORE properties: (i) Obtain from the agency’s legal division an opinion that outlines and clarifies the requirements for handling PII at ORE properties; (ii) Review existing policies, procedures, guidance, and training and make adjustments where necessary; and (iii) Establish “the appropriate disposition of the PII that was identified at three of the ORE properties reviewed during the audit and that is currently in off-site storage.”

LinkedInFacebookTwitterGoogle+Share

Washington Enacts Legislation Strengthening Data Breach Notification Requirements

On April 23, Washington Governor Jay Inslee signed bill H.R.1078, which requires covered entities to contact consumers living within the state as soon as possible, and no more than 45 days, after the discovery of a breach of personal information. Under the new law, failure to notify consumers of a data breach would violate the state’s Consumer Protection Act. The legislation also requires covered entities to notify the state attorney general and grants the attorney general authority to pursue enforcement actions on behalf of the state or consumers living within the state. The new law goes into effect July 24, 2015.

LinkedInFacebookTwitterGoogle+Share

FTC Settles With Debt Brokers For Leaking Sensitive Consumer Information

On April 13, the FTC announced that two debt brokers agreed to settle two separate cases filed last year involving the leaking of over 55,000 consumers’ personal information. The brokers allegedly shared consumers’ personal information online – including credit card numbers, names, addresses, and bank account numbers – via unencrypted documents. Although the information was geared towards members of the debt collection industry, it was available to anyone with an internet connection. According to the FTC, the publicly available information put consumers at risk of identity theft and/or phantom debt collection. Under the terms of both proposed settlement agreements (Orders), the brokers would be required to: (i) implement and effectively maintain security programs that will protect consumers’ information; and (ii) have their respective security programs examined initially by a certified third party and again, thereafter, every two years for a duration of 20 years after service of the Orders. The FTC unanimously approved the proposed Orders and has filed them in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia for final court approval.

LinkedInFacebookTwitterGoogle+Share

Spotlight: Q&A with BuckleySandler’s Douglas F. Gansler, Former Attorney General of Maryland

Doug-Gansler-webOn January 20, 2015, Douglas F. Gansler, former Attorney General of Maryland, joined BuckleySandler LLP as a Partner in the firm’s Washington, DC, office upon completion of his second term as Maryland Attorney General. An accomplished trial lawyer and appellate advocate with a unanimous victory before the U.S. Supreme Court, Doug’s in-depth knowledge and understanding of complex civil, criminal and enforcement matters will be, as firm Chairman Andrew L. Sandler recently noted, “an invaluable asset for firm clients in navigating the government enforcement challenges they confront on a daily basis.”

As he makes the transition to private practice, Doug is optimistic about the opportunities in front of him and is looking forward to getting to know his new colleagues and meeting with firm clients. He shares some added professional and personal insights for InfoBytes Spotlight. Read more…

LinkedInFacebookTwitterGoogle+Share

FTC Releases Report on the “Internet of Things”

On January 28, the FTC released a comprehensive report detailing what the so-called “Internet of Things” is, how it is being used, and how both consumers and businesses can protect themselves.  The report defines the Internet of Things as “devices or sensors – other than computers, smartphones, or tablets – that connect, store or transmit information with or between each other via the Internet,” and that are sold to or used by consumers.  The report focuses on consumer privacy and security and offers a variety of recommendations for those companies offering devices that fall within the definition, including that security be a key part of the design process and data collection be limited where possible.  The report does not call for new legislation specific to the Internet of Things because the FTC believes such legislation would be premature.  The FTC states that it will use existing authority under laws such as the FTC Act, the Fair Credit Reporting Act, the Hi-Tech Act, and the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act to take actions against Internet of Things products and services as necessary to protect consumers.

LinkedInFacebookTwitterGoogle+Share

President Obama Proposes New Data Privacy Legislation

On January 12, President Obama announced new privacy initiatives to combat identity theft, enhance consumer security, and improve data privacy online and in the classroom. His main legislative proposals call for (i) a Personal Data Notification & Protection Act, which would specify the obligations that companies have when a consumer’s personal information has been exposed, establish a 30-day notification requirement following a company’s discovery of a data breach, and criminalize illicit overseas trade in identities; (ii) a Consumer Privacy Bill of Rights; and (iii) increased protections for data collected from students.  The President called for Congressional support, saying privacy is not a partisan issue.

LinkedInFacebookTwitterGoogle+Share

National Institute of Standards and Technology Publishes New Guidance on Privacy Controls

On December 16, the NIST announced the release of its new guidance on assessing the security and privacy safeguards for federal information systems and organizations. The updated guidance will be used by government IT security professionals to “assess a wide range of software configurations, physical security measures and operating procedures meant to safeguard information systems from both chance failures and hostile attacks.” The new guidance complements the NIST’s Security and Privacy Controls for Federal Information Systems and Organizations catalogue.

LinkedInFacebookTwitterGoogle+Share

Minnesota Federal Judge Allows Data Breach Suit Against Target to Proceed

On December 2, District Judge Paul Magnuson denied Target’s motion to dismiss the class action suit brought by banks in response to its 2013 data breach.  In re: Target Corporation Customer Data Security Breach Litigation, MDL No. 14-2522 (D. Minn., Dec. 2, 2014).  The banks have alleged four claims against Target: (i) a general negligence claim that Target breached its duty to provide security and prevent the data breach; (ii) that Target violated Minnesota’s Plastic Security Card Act (PSCA) by retaining customer data which was subsequently stolen; (iii) that a violation of the PSCA is negligence per se; and (iv) a negligent misrepresentation by omission claim that Target made public statements regarding the strength of their data security system when they knew or should have known it was deficient.  The first three were allowed to proceed and the last was dismissed with leave to amend the complaint for a failure to allege the requisite reliance upon Target’s assertion of its secure system.  Notably, Judge Magnuson found that the PSCA applies to all transactions completed by a company operating in Minnesota, not just transactions occurring within the state.

LinkedInFacebookTwitterGoogle+Share

Trade Associations Submit Letter to Congress regarding Cybersecurity Information Sharing

On December 3, the Merchant and Financial Associations Cybersecurity Partnership (“Partnership”) submitted a letter to Congress requesting its consideration of adopting cybersecurity information sharing legislation. Created in February in response to high profile security breaches, the Partnership aims to protect retailers and financial institutions against cyber attacks. In its letter, the Partnership suggests that Congress adopt legislation that would “increase the current level of voluntary cybersecurity information sharing, while recognizing and responding to key privacy concerns.”

LinkedInFacebookTwitterGoogle+Share

Digital Insights & Trends: “Digital Assets” … or Liabilities?

Margo Tank, Head of Digital Commerce Practice

Delaware’s Fiduciary Access to Digital Assets and Digital Accounts Act (H.B. 345) makes Delaware the latest state to regulate access to “digital assets” after death. Unless the account-holder instructs otherwise, legally appointed fiduciaries will: (1) have the same access to digital assets as they have always had to tangible assets, and (2) the same duty to comply with the account-holder’s instructions. In short, the personal representative or guardian of a digital account-holder can access the emails, documents, audio, video, images, social media content, computer programs, software licenses, usernames and passwords created on the deceased’s digital devices or stored electronically. This access could be very helpful, or extremely problematic, depending on what the digital records reveal. Read more…

LinkedInFacebookTwitterGoogle+Share

FCC Joins Global Privacy Enforcement Network

On October 28, amid growing threats to consumer privacy, the FCC announced that it has joined the Global Privacy Enforcement Network (GPEN), an international group of privacy regulators and enforcers. The move will allow the FCC to more easily collect and share data among approximately 50 privacy and data protection authorities from around the world. The FCC joins the FTC as the only two agencies representing the United States in cross-border GPEN proceedings.

LinkedInFacebookTwitterGoogle+Share

CFPB Finalizes Rule To Limit Relief From Annual Privacy Notice Delivery Requirements

On October 20, the CFPB finalized its amendment to Regulation P, which requires that financial institutions meet specific consumer data-sharing requirements, including the delivery of annual privacy notices. Under the new rule, bank and nonbank institutions under the CFPB’s jurisdiction will now be allowed to post privacy notices online, rather than deliver an annual paper copy. Institutions that choose to post notices online must meet certain conditions, including (i) providing notice to consumers if the institution shares any data to third parties, in addition to providing an opportunity to opt out of such sharing; and, (ii) using the 2009 model disclosure form developed by federal regulatory agencies. The institutions that choose to rely on the new delivery method must (i) ensure that customers are aware of the notices posted online; (ii) provide paper copies within ten days of a customer’s request; and, (iii) make customers aware that the privacy notice(s) are available online—and that a paper copy will be provided at the customer’s request—by inserting a “clear and conspicuous statement at least once per year on an account statement, coupon book, or a notice or disclosure.” As outlined when the proposed rule was issued in May, the CFPB anticipates that the rule will: (i) provide consumers with constant access to privacy notices; (ii) limit the amount of an institution’s data sharing with third parties; (iii) educate consumers on the various types of privacy policies available to them; and, (iv) reduce the cost for companies to provide privacy notices.

LinkedInFacebookTwitterGoogle+Share

Delaware Enacts Law Governing Access To Digital Records After Death

On August 12, Delaware Governor Jack A. Markell signed the Digital Access and Digital Accounts Act, the first law in the nation to comprehensively govern access to a person’s digital assets, including social media and email accounts, after the person dies or becomes incapacitated. Under the new law, a Delaware resident’s digital assets will become part of his or her estate after death, and these assets will be accessible to heirs to the same extent as the deceased person’s physical, tangible assets. Digital assets are defined broadly to include data, texts, email, audio, video, images, sounds, social media and social networking content, health care and insurance records, computer codes and programs, software and software licenses, and databases, along with usernames and passwords. The law expressly does not apply to digital accounts of an employer regularly used by an employee in the usual course of business. The law requires any company that controls a person’s digital assets to give the legal fiduciary for the deceased’s estate the usernames, passwords, and any other information needed to gain access to the digital assets upon a valid written request. Any contrary provisions in service agreements or privacy policies that limit a fiduciary’s access to digital accounts are void, although the account owner can specify that the account should remain private after death. The law also grants the company controlling the digit assets immunity for complying with valid requests for account access. The new law takes effect January 1, 2015.

LinkedInFacebookTwitterGoogle+Share