FDIC Issues List of Banks Examined for CRA Compliance

On February 3, the FDIC released its February 2017 list of state nonmember banks recently evaluated for compliance with the Community Reinvestment Act (CRA). As part of the Financial Institutions Reform, Recovery, and Enforcement Act of 1989 (FIRREA), Congress mandated the public disclosure of an evaluation and rating for each bank or thrift that undergoes a CRA examination on or after July 1, 1990. A monthly list of banks examined for CRA compliance dating back to 1996 can be accessed here. The February 2017 list covers evaluation ratings that the FDIC assigned to institutions in November 2016. Of the 49 banks evaluated, five were rated Outstanding, 43 received a Satisfactory rating, and one was rated Needs to Improve.

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OCC, FDIC, and Fed Release Stress Test Scenarios for 2017

On February 3, the Fed announced the release of the “Supervisory Scenarios” to be used by banks and supervisors for the 2017 Comprehensive Capital Analysis and Review (CCAR) and Dodd-Frank Act stress test exercises and also issued instructions to firms participating in CCAR. The Fed also published three letters that provide additional information on its stress-testing program. The three letters describe: (i) the Horizontal Capital Review for large, noncomplex companies; (ii) the CCAR qualitative assessment for U.S. intermediate holding companies of foreign banks, which are submitting capital plans for the first time; and (iii) improvements to how the Fed will estimate post-stress capital ratios.

On February 3, the OCC similarly released economic and financial market scenarios for 2017 that are to be used by national banks and federal savings associations (with total consolidated assets of more than $10 billion) in their annual Dodd-Frank Act-mandated stress test. On February 6, the FDIC released its stress test scenarios, working in consultation with the Fed and OCC.

The three sets of supervisory scenarios provide each agency with forward-looking information for use in bank supervision and will assist the agencies in assessing the covered institutions’ risk profile and capital adequacy.

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Fed Survey: CRE Tightening Trend Continues

On February 6, the Fed released its January 2017 senior loan officer survey, addressing changes in the standards and terms on, and demand for, bank loans to businesses and households over the past three months. The January survey results indicated that over the fourth quarter of 2016, on balance, lenders left their standards on commercial and industrial (“C&I”) loans unchanged, while tightening credit for commercial real estate (“CRE”) loans. Banks reported that they expect to ease standards on C&I loans and for the asset quality of such loans to improve somewhat this year. In contrast, banks expect to tighten standards on CRE loans, while they expect the asset quality of most CRE loan categories to remain unchanged. As to loans to households, banks reported that demand for most types of home-purchase loans weakened over the fourth quarter. On balance, banks reported that they expect to ease standards and to see asset quality improve somewhat for most residential home-purchase loans in 2017.

For additional details see:

 

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Rep. Wilson Introduces Bill to Delay Fiduciary Rule

On January 6, Rep. Joe Wilson (R-S.C.) introduced the Protecting American Families’ Retirement Advice Act, a bill that would delay by two years the effective date of the Department of Labor’s “fiduciary rule.” As discussed previously on InfoBytes, the fiduciary rule—which is presently set to take effect in April 2017—expands the definition of “investment advisor” to include a “wider array of advice relationships,” thereby imparting new standards on financial advisors and brokers handling retirement accounts. In a statement, Rep. Wilson described the Fiduciary Rule as “one of the most costly, burdensome regulations to come from the Obama Administration.” Wilson’s proposed legislation seeks to delay the rule’s implementation in order to “giv[e] Congress and President-elect Donald Trump adequate time to re-evaluate.”

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Trump Announces CFPB Transition Team

On January 5, 2016, the Trump Transition team announced the names of the four individuals assigned to lead the President-elect’s CFPB “Landing Team.” Generally, each landing team is tasked with collect information on each agency—ranging from the agency’s budget and policies to the status of various rulemakings and the current administration’s priorities—all with the overarching purpose of facilitating an orderly transfer of power at the federal financial regulators. The CFPB Landing Team includes:

  • Paul Atkins, former GOP Commissioner for the SEC and current CEO of Patomak Global Partners LLC, which provides consulting services concerning financial services industry matters, regulatory compliance, risk and crisis management, public affairs, independent reviews, litigation support, and strategy.
  • Kyle Hauptman, Senior Development Manager and occasional writer about financial & political issues for the American Enterprise Institute (AEI), member of the SEC’s Advisory Committee on Small and Emerging Companies, and former chief economic adviser on the issues of Financial Markets, Housing to the Romney For President (RFP) campaign.
  • Consuala “CJ” Jordan, a public relations executive and Republican political consultant who is currently CEO of The Jordan Management Group, LLC, a full service Government Relations and Public Affairs Firm, specializing in strategic business development.
  • Julie B. Lindsay, Managing Director and General Counsel of Capital Markets and Corporate Reporting at Citigroup Inc., and former Counsel to Commissioner Glassman at the SEC.
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